Author: Socialist Party ZambiaThe Socialist Party is a political formation whose primary mandate is to promote and entrench socialist values in the Zambian society. Anchored on the principles of Justice, Equity and Peace (JEP), the Socialist Party shall transform the Zambian society from capitalism to socialism, building socialism in three key sectors: Education, Agriculture and Health.

Socialism is not a complicated concept – Dr M’membe

Socialism is not a complicated concept – Dr M’membe

FRED M’membe says socialism is not a complicated concept.
Meanwhile, Dr M’membe, the Socialist Party president, says he cannot be a burden-bearer for President Edgar Lungu.
Dr M’membe featured on Hot FM radio’s Red Hot breakfast show on Tuesday, October 13, 2020.
He explained that socialism was simply giving a dignified life to citizens.
“Socialism is not a complicated thing as people try to make it. It’s not about bombastic words, bombastic concepts. Socialism is simply giving a dignified life to our people, by providing them with services that make life dignified,” Dr M’membe clarified.
“Our priority will be to give our children the education they need. So, we’ll socialise education and make it free from nursery, at the age of three, all the way to university.”
He asserted that a better society, in the modern world, could not be built with uneducated people.
“It’s not possible!” Dr M’membe argued.
“The more a woman gets educated, the lesser and lesser infant mortality rates you have, because they are able to look after children better. So, it will be compulsory for every citizen to go to school up to Grade 12.”
Dr M’membe added that under a socialist-oriented government, “the adults who are illiterate today, within two years, we’ll make them literate.”
“We’ll have a huge literacy campaign, which we have already started….” he said.
He also explained that Northern Rhodesia (Zambia) had been on the current capitalist path since 1891 when Cecil Rhodes and his company, the British South Africa Company (BSA), colonised the territory.
“We have been on that path to this very day from 1891. We know what capitalism has done to our country. If capitalism had succeeded in this country, there would be no need for any other system. There would be no need for socialism,” Dr M’membe noted.
“But capitalism has not only impoverished our people but it has also killed.

By Socialist Party reporter

Zambia now divided into two, the haves and have-nots – Dr Mwikisa

Zambia now divided into two, the haves and have-nots – Dr Mwikisa


SOCIALIST Party second vice-president Dr Chris Ngenda Mwikisa has regretted that Zambia is now evidently divided into the haves and the have-nots.
Dr Mwikisa is a member of the Socialist Party politburo and the central committee, as well as the general treasurer of the party.
On Monday, October 12, 2020, he unveiled names of aspiring parliamentary candidates in three provinces – Western, Eastern and Lusaka.
The names of those adopted are Chiteo Singongi (Kalabo), Matakala (Nkeyema), Sitali Likubangu (Sikongo), Preston Chinyama (Nalolo), Ntazana Musukuma (Chawama), John Zulu (Kasenengwa), Martin Phiri (Mkaika) and Kenani Kalala (Chipangali).
Dr Mwikisa said the aforementioned comrades were selected in their communities/constituencies to stand as members of parliament.
“Those adopted clearly understands the values, principles of socialism and the Socialist Party. We are driven by solidarity, humility, equity,” Dr Mwikisa said.
He added that it was common knowledge to all everyone now that Zambia was one of the poorest countries.
“Today we have one Zambia but two nations; a nation of the well-off and a nation of the poor. That is what the Socialist Party is trying to change, to ensure [that] there is equity,”
“These comrades will work hard to ensure that there is equity in their constituencies.”
He also indicated that it was not right for a country like Zambia, with abundant water bodies, to have so many people with no access to water for drinking and other domestic uses.
The adopted candidates assured of their commitment to the socialist cause, and that they would complement Socialist Party president Dr Fred M’membe and the party’s structures, as a way of effecting positive development.

By Socialist Party reporter

Reflections on Kelvin Mukuka’s lone protest at State House

Reflections on Kelvin Mukuka’s lone protest at State House

Last week Kelvin Mukuka staged a lone protest at State House and was arrested by the police. Kelvin was questioning why it was only members and supporters of the Patriotic Front who are allowed to hold rallies and protests.

“There is no freedom of expression… a lot of people are being intimidated. If it’s to go to jail, I’ll go. If it’s to sleep in the cells, I’ll sleep. I don’t mind! What I want is good governance,” cried out Kelvin.

Truly, everything can be tolerated, except injustice. The saying that “it is sin to commit injustice, but it is a greater sin to tolerate injustice” holds true because if one continues to tolerate the injustice being done now, then it gives the offenders the courage to continue with their sins and there shall be no end to it.

Unless one raise their voices for honesty, truth and compassion against the injustice, greed and lies, the situation will not change on its own. We need to speak the truth even if our voice shakes.

People don’t bother if injustice is being done to some one but it makes a huge difference when the same situation is being faced by them or their loved ones. If you see an injustice it’s better to voice your opinion be it for yourself or others.

It takes a lot of courage, efforts to stand up for what you believe in and it may involve a lot of risks as well. What you allow is what you continue. Never ever be bullied in to silence, for you will allow yourself to be made into a victim.

Do not let some one get comfortable by disrespecting you. One needs to stand up for what one believes in even if it means standing alone. It does take a lot to stand alone.

One should refuse to be disrespected at all no matter what. You cannot always be nice, people will take advantage of you – you have to set boundaries.

Every person needs to set boundaries beyond which they should not let any one do any damage to them. Allowing some one to disrespect or mistreat you should never be acceptable no matter what. At times one has to stand up alone to face the injustice.

Fred M’membe

Garden Compound, Lusaka
October 12, 2020

Reflections on the widening gap between the have and have nots

Reflections on the widening gap between the have and have nots

The situation in our country today is such that a few enjoy the right to an adequate standard of living while the majority are deprived of such an enjoyment. The minority have everything and the majority have nothing. And there’s a widening gap between the rich and the poor. In the interests of adequate standard of living as a human right, such status quo needs to be addressed.

Many of our fellow citizens still live in circumstances which are hardly compatible with their dignity as sons and daughters of God. Their life is a struggle for survival. At the same time a minority enjoys the fruits of development and can afford to live in luxury and wealth. We appeal for a more just, fair, equal and humane distribution of the nation’s wealth.

It may be argued, of course, that those who enjoy the highest standards of living have achieved this through hard work and that they deserve the benefits of their efforts, regardless of the poverty affecting others. There are many reasons for rejecting this argument.

Firstly, it is sinful to keep for oneself an overabundance of wealth when one’s brothers and sisters are suffering and even dying for want of simple necessities. In such a situation, it is of no consequence how and why some people come to be excessively wealthy while others starve. Christian justice demands that sufficient sharing takes place to ensure that the basic needs of all are met.

Secondly, the rich are rich because the poor are poor.

Thirdly, even if the demands of charity are rejected, and even if it were possible to argue that those enjoying excessive wealth are fully justified in doing so, common sense dictates that our society cannot prosper under these conditions.

The good of each of us in the long term is secured and promoted by the common good of all. Glaring inequalities can only precipitate social instability and threaten the well-being of all, rich and poor. History abounds with instances where the rich and the powerful have brought about their own downfall by refusing to recognise in good time the legitimate demands of the poor.

As Jimmy Cliff sang in a reggae rhythm – Remake the World – a revolutionary transformation of our country is urgently needed:

Too many people are suffering
Too many people are sad
Too likeable people got everything
While too many people got nothing

Remake the world
With love and happiness
Remake the world
Put your conscience in the test
Remake the world
North, south, east and west
Remake the world
Gotta prove that are the best, yeah

Too many people are suffering
Too many people are sad
Too likeable people got everything
While too many people got nothing

Remake the world
Come on human dignity
Remake the world
Wipe strife and poverty
Remake the world…

Dr Fred M’membe
Garden Compound, Lusaka.

Reflections on our very frightening economic crisis

Reflections on our very frightening economic crisis

We and our leaders, those governing our country, must realise and acknowledge that we are in a very serious economic crisis.

Our debt is now around US $23 billion if we add domestic arrears, government guarantees, VAT refunds, external debt, local debt and money owed by state owned enterprises. Now that the kwacha has depreciated by over 40 per cent, there is a corresponding reduction in the size of the economy from $25 billion last year to $18.2 billion this year. Which gives us the debt to GDP ration of around 112 per cent and likely to go further up next year to between 115 per cent to 118 per cent.

This is the reality we have to face. We can try to evade this reality, but we cannot evade the consequences of evading this reality.

What we need is an economic recovery programme for two to three years before we can even start talking about growing the economy.

Fred M’membe
Mwika Royal Village, Chinsali